This is the FINAL chapter of my 12-Part Series on Leaky Gut and Family Health.  Part 1: Leaky Gut: What Is it, And Do You and Your Child Have It?  Part 2:  Leaky Gut According to Chinese Medicine  Part 3: The 4 R’s to Gut Healing:  Removal (Step 1)  Part 4: The Feingold Diet for Behavioral Problems  Part 5: Real Food 101  Part 6: Autoimmune Paleo Protocol for Leaky Gut  Part 7: The 4 R’s to Gut Healing: Replacement (Step 2)  Part 8: Reinoculation Phase for Healing Leaky Gut  Part 9: Repair Phase for Healing Leaky Gut  Part 10: Healing Leaky Gut:  Challenges of Going Through Dietary Changes and How to Succeed and Part 11: Raising Kids with Healthy Cravings    

In the previous 11 articles in this series, we discussed what leaky gut syndrome is, what the symptoms are, how it is diagnosed, and the 4-step gut-healing protocol which encompasses the autoimmune protocol diet and targeted supplementation to heal and seal the gut. Now in this final article, we’re tying everything together with resources to help you implement the “how” of healing from leaky gut syndrome.

Food sourcing can be a daunting task, especially when you’re trying to avoid foods that are so ubiquitous in our food supply these days: wheat, corn, barley, rye, rice, gluten, dairy, soy, eggs, GMOs, legumes, nuts, seeds, tomatoes, eggplants, white potatoes, and peppers. Most of these foods do not have to be eliminated permanently, but during the gut-healing process it is absolutely imperative that you avoid these foods entirely. Even one bite of gluten-filled cake could result in a flare-up that will disrupt the healing process.

It’s important to know that this gut-healing protocol gets easier over time. You can set yourself up for success by stocking your kitchen with everything you need to get started, throwing out or giving away any food that is not compliant with the diet, and preparing your meals and snacks at the beginning of the week so that you aren’t tempted to grab the wrong foods when you’re hungry.

Since cookware can retain traces of gluten and other food allergens, it’s a good idea to invest in some new cookware that has never contained bread, pasta, corn, etc. Choose stainless steel or earthenware kitchen equipment and avoid non-stick, plastic, or aluminum equipment. One online resource for high quality non-toxic cookware is Goldmine Natural Foods. An ordinary slow cooker or an Instant Pot can also be used to cook most meals, with minimal prep time required.

Staple pantry items for the autoimmune protocol (AIP) can include the following:

Tiger Nut Flour — made from a starchy tuber and used for baking

Tiger Nuts — for snacking or for making homemade grainless, nut-free granola

Sweet potatoes — many different varieties, not part of the nightshade family

Coconut flour — for making pancakes, baking, thickening soups and gravies

Seasonings including sea salt, oregano, mint, thyme, rosemary, dill, chives, and cinnamon

Vegetables including lettuce, celery, kale, beets, carrots, onions, green beans, and cauliflower

Seasonal fruits including raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, lemons, apples, and oranges

Grass-fed, organic, or antibiotic-free meats and poultry (available online through US Wellness meats)

Wild-caught fish and shellfish including Alaskan salmon, sardines, mackerel, shrimp, oysters, and mussels (available online through Vital Choice)

Ready-made meals for your convenience are available as well for on-the-go compliance with the autoimmune protocol (AIP):

Paleo On The Go Autoimmune Protocol Meals

Pete’s Paleo

Heather’s Choice Meals for Adventuring (some meals are AIP-friendly)

Urban Remedy (several meals and some snacks are AIP-friendly)

Books and Cookbooks to help you along your journey:

The Healing Kitchen

Healing With Paleo: A Step-By-Step Guide to the Paleo Autoimmune Protocol

The Alternative Autoimmune Cookbook

The Wahls Protocol

The Paleo Autoimmune Protocol: Quick Reference Food Chart

Online stores for specialty items:

Wild Mountain Paleo Market — has a great selection of probiotic cultured foods, snacks, and pantry essentials

Barefoot Provisions — has an entire collection of autoimmune protocol compliant foods and natural body care products

FATFACE Skincare — non-toxic, gluten-free skincare and deodorant


Taking the leap and starting on your gut-healing protocol can be a fun and exciting adventure when you’ve replaced your pantry, freezer, and refrigerator with nourishing, healing foods. Some items may be familiar favorites, such as sweet potatoes and grass-fed steak. Other items, such as tiger nuts and kombucha, might become new favorites. Set a start date for your gut-healing protocol and stick with it. Work with your acupuncturist if you need accountability and support. Enjoy the journey!

This is the FINAL chapter of my 12-Part Series on Leaky Gut and Family Health.  Part 1: Leaky Gut: What Is it, And Do You and Your Child Have It?  Part 2:  Leaky Gut According to Chinese Medicine  Part 3: The 4 R’s to Gut Healing:  Removal (Step 1)  Part 4: The Feingold Diet for Behavioral Problems  Part 5: Real Food 101  Part 6: Autoimmune Paleo Protocol for Leaky Gut  Part 7: The 4 R’s to Gut Healing: Replacement (Step 2)  Part 8: Reinoculation Phase for Healing Leaky Gut  Part 9: Repair Phase for Healing Leaky Gut  Part 10: Healing Leaky Gut:  Challenges of Going Through Dietary Changes and How to Succeed and Part 11: Raising Kids with Healthy Cravings